Kyron Richard Horman – June 04, 2010 – Portland, Oregon

http://www.findthemissing.org/en/photos/full/11194

Missing:  Kyron Richard Horman

Case: Endangered Missing

Missing From: Portland, Oregon

Missing Date: June 04, 2010

Race: Caucasian        Sex: male

Age at Time Missing: 7

Year of Birth:  2002

Height: 3’8

Weight: 50 pounds

Hair Color: Brown

Eye Color: Blue

Tattoos: N/A

Scars/Piercings/Unique Marks: 

Other: Kyron wears metal-framed eyeglasses; allergic to bee stings.

Last Seen Wearing: A black t-shirt with “CSI” in green lettering and a handprint image on the front, size 7 black cargo pants, white Hanes athletic socks and worn size 11 black Sketchers sneakers with orange trim.

Police Agency: Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office 503-823-3333

Case Number:  10-403516     NCMEC 1149070  NamUs # 7517 www.namus.gov

Circumstance: Kyron was last seen in Portland, Oregon on June 4, 2010. He usually rode the bus to Skyline Elementary School, where he was a second-grader. The school is in the 11500 block of Skyline Boulevard in a rural area in northwest Portland, about two miles from Kyron’s home in the 15700 block of Sheltered Nook Road. His stepmother, Terri Lynn Moulton Horman, (Kyron’s stepmother married to his father Kaine Horman) stated in police reports that she drove him to school because there was a science fair that day and Kyron wanted to set up his exhibit, a display about the Red-Eyed Tree Frog. They arrived shortly after 8:00 a.m. and she stated she dropped Kyron’s coat and backpack off at his classroom. A witness saw Terri and Kyron together at 8:15 p.m., in front of Kyron’s exhibit. The bell rang at 8:45 a.m. and Terri says she left then. She said Kyron told her he was going to his classroom. He has never been heard from again.

Terri reported Kyron missing at 3:45 p.m., after he failed to arrive home at 3:30 p.m. as scheduled. No one reported having seen Kyron at the school after the 8:45 bell. His teacher marked him absent after classes began at 10:00 a.m.; she thought he was at a doctor’s appointment. Because so many hours had passed since he was last seen, police launched an extensive search immediately. Over the next few days they interviewed all the students and staff at Skyline Elementary School and searched the school, school grounds and the surrounding area. It was one of the largest searches in Oregon history. Kyron’s loved ones described him as timid and stated he would be unlikely to leave the school and go off on his own.

Less than two weeks after Kyron’s disappearance, police stopped the search and announced they had upgraded his case from a simple missing child to a criminal investigation. At the same time, they stated they didn’t think Kyron had been abducted by a stranger. They focused on Terri, stating cellular phone records indicated she wasn’t where she said she was on the day of her stepson’s disappearance.

Three weeks after Kyron’s disappearance, on June 26, Kaine moved out of the family home. That same day, Terri placed two 911 calls from their residence. The first one, at 5:17 p.m., was classified as a “threats” call, and the second, at 11:39 p.m., was classified as a “child custody” call. Kaine wasn’t home when either call was placed. During the following days, the police released more information to the public: a landscaper who worked for the Horman family had told investigators that about six or seven months before Kyron disappeared, Terri offered him money to kill her husband. When authorities notified Kaine of this, the news prompted to him to take his youngest child and move out. The police attempted a sting, bringing the landscaper to Terri’s door to demand money while undercover agents watched from nearby, but Terri called 911 instead to say someone was demanding $10,000 from her. Kaine filed for divorce and a restraining order from Terri, saying he and the police believed she was responsible for Kyron’s disappearance in addition to the attempted murder-for-hire. A judge barred Terri from contacting Kaine, Kyron, the younger sibling or her own teenage son. Kaine sought custody of the youngest child and child support from Terri. He accused Terri of attempting to abduct the child from her day care two days after the restraining order was granted, of beginning an affair with another man four days after Kaine moved out, and of sharing sensitive information, including Kaine’s new address, with the man. In mid-July, Terri moved to her hometown of Roseburg, Oregon and Kaine and the younger child moved back into their Portland house. It is unknown if she has custody of her teenage son.

In May 2012, Desiree (Kyron’s biological mother who has continually searched for her son) filed a lawsuit against Terri, accusing her of kidnapping Kyron and seeking $10 million in damages. She has asked the court to order Terri to return Kyron, or say where his body is. The Hormans’ divorce is pending. Authorities have yet to name a suspect in Kyron’s disappearance, in spite of their focus on his stepmother Kaine speculated Terri caused the child’s disappearance in an effort to hurt him, and suggested she may have had help from other individual. Both of Kyron’s parents continue to hope that he is alive. His case remains unsolved.

FACEBOOK PAGE: “Missing Kyron Horman”

NCMEC Age Progression photo

 

Photo at time missing – Kyron Horman

http://www.findthemissing.org/en/photos/full/11194

Photo taken on day disappeared

http://www.findthemissing.org/en/photos/full/11193

 

 

 

 

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